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Contributions

Share your knowledge and know-how with the largest online community of surgeons!

You can contribute to WebSurg by submitting your minimally invasive surgery videos that will help us increase the scope of our educational content. This is a unique opportunity for you to share your surgical skills with the largest community of surgeons worldwide, and become part of our international Faculty.

You’re not an expert in video editing? No problem! Submit the video of your surgical procedure and our editorial and audiovisual team will take care of the rest for free.

Upload your video

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Requirements

In order to be published on WebSurg, you need to make sure that your video brings something relevant to WebSurg. Send us a video demonstrating a comprehensive surgical case which has not been covered on the website yet. The objective of contributions is to offer varied types of educational videos to our members, in a more interactive, didactic, and original way.

The quality of the video must be high-definition to be considered for a potential publication on WebSurg. An abstract of less than 250 words to present the case and educational objectives of the video, the titles of the key steps (e.g. timed chapters of the video such as "case history", "patient set-up and port position", etc. mentioning minutes and seconds), and author name(s) have to be submitted along with your video. These indications will allow our editorial team to perform a synchronized voice over and to provide relevant content to our members.

Advantages

It is fast, free, and user-friendly. Publishing your work on the world’s number 1 minimally invasive surgery website is a great opportunity for you to share your expertise and your surgical skills with the rest of the world. We highlight our contributors by sharing their publications with our 370,000 members, and we provide them statistics allowing them to measure the impact their video had on our community.

Who can contribute?

Anyone is welcome to submit their contributions, whether it is to share a new technique, a novel technological innovation or to present a standard surgical procedure in compliance with international guidelines and consensus recommendations in an original and didactic way.

Validation process

Videos submitted to us are sent to a peer-review committee who will decide if the video can be published on WebSurg. This decision depends on the technical quality of the video and on its scientific relevance and compliance with international guidelines, but also on its originality. We remain at your disposal throughout this process to inform you on the status of your video publication.

Should your video not be validated by our editorial team, we will give you the reasons for this. However you are still more than welcome to send us more videos.

Get more info

Video structure

01.

Title

10s
02.

List of authors

10s

Author names and their titles (MD, PhD, etc.).

03.

Clinical case

15-20s

Patient age and gender, clinical and medical history, surgical indications, etc. Views of CT-scans, MRI or other diagnostic tools. Find a template on this page.

04.

Patient

15-20s

Patient, trocar, and operating staff position.

05.

Film

~15 minutes

English video written narrative with a full description of the surgical procedure and of the postoperative outcomes.

06.

Credits

5-10s

What are you waiting for? Become a WebSurg expert!

Contribute now

The latest contributions

Surgical intervention
11:48
Laparoscopic rectal resection with ICG-guided nodal navigation
The concept of fluorescence-guided navigation surgery based on indocyanine green (ICG) testifies to a developing interest in many fields of surgical oncology. The technique seems to be promising, also during nodal dissection in gastric and colorectal surgery in the so-called “ICG-guided nodal navigation”.
In this video, we present the clinical case of a 66-year-old woman with a sigmoid-rectal junction early stage cancer submitted to laparoscopic resection. Before surgery, the patient was submitted to endoscopy with the objective to mark the distal margin of the neoplasia, and 2mL of ICG were injected into the mucosa of the rectum, 2cm distal to the inferior border of the tumor.
Thanks to the ICG’s fluorescence with the light emitted from the photodynamic eye of our laparoscopic system (Stryker 1588 camera system), it is possible to clearly visualize both the individual lymph nodes and the lymphatic collectors which drain ICG (and lymph) of the specific mucosal area previously marked with indocyanine green.
It was possible to verify the good perfusion of the proximal stump of the anastomosis before the Knight-Griffen anastomosis was performed, thanks to an intravenous injection of ICG.
This technique could allow for a more precise and radical nodal dissection, a safer work respecting vascular and nerve structures, and could be related with a lower risk of anastomotic fistula, controlling the adequate perfusion of the stump.
Laparoscopic rectal resection with ICG-guided nodal navigation
G Baiocchi, S Molfino, B Molteni, A Titi, G Gaverini
820 views
1 month ago
Surgical intervention
06:45
Combined abdominal - transanal laparoscopic approach (taTME) for low rectal cancers
Objective: to describe the TaTME surgical technique for the treatment of low rectal cancers.
Methods: The procedure was performed in two phases: first, by an abdominal laparoscopic approach consisting in the high ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery and vein, and complete splenic flexure mobilization. The pelvic dissection was continued in the Total Mesorectal Excision (TME) plane to the level of the puborectal sling posteriorly and of the seminal vesicles anteriorly.
Secondly, the procedure continued by transanal laparoscopic approach: A Lone Star® retractor was placed prior to the platform insertion (Gelpoint Path®). Under direct vision of the tumor, a purse-string suture was performed to obtain a secure distal margin and a completed closure of the lumen. It is essential to achieve a complete circumferential full-thickness rectotomy before facing the dissection cranially via the TME plane. Both planes, transanal and abdominal, are connected by the two surgical teams. The specimen was then extracted through a suprapubic incision. A circular end-to-end stapled anastomosis was made intracorporeally. Finally, a loop ileostomy was performed.
Results: A 75-year-old man with low rectal cancer (uT3N1-Rullier’s I-II classification), was treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and TaTME. Operative time was 240 minutes, including 90 minutes for the perineal phase. There were no postoperative complications and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. The pathology report showed a complete mesorectum excision and free margins (ypT1N1a).
Conclusions: The TaTME technique is a safe option for the treatment of low rectal cancers, especially in male patients with a narrow pelvis. It is a feasible and reproducible technique for surgeons with previous experience in advanced laparoscopic procedures and transanal surgery.
Combined abdominal - transanal laparoscopic approach (taTME) for low rectal cancers
S Qian, P Tejedor, M Leon, M Ortega, C Pastor
985 views
1 month ago
Surgical intervention
14:02
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy for a recurrent GIST
GISTs are tumors of the gastrointestinal stroma which, although rare, are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the digestive tract. They are most common in the stomach and small intestine, in patients aged between 50 and 70 years. The definitive diagnosis is established with immunohistochemistry (CD117), and the risk of postoperative recurrence should be estimated. Studies relate small intestine’s lesions with greater aggressiveness; however, more recent studies emphasize mitotic index and lesion size.
The clinical case is that of a 53-year-old woman with a stage TNM IIIb, AFIP 6b gastric GIST. In 2013, she underwent a sleeve gastrectomy followed by the daily administration of Imatinib (400mg). After 3 years of adjuvant therapy, she stopped treatment. In May 2017, in a follow-up CT-scan, a solid, heterogeneous 6.7cm lesion appeared in the left hypochondrium, separated from the metal suture, invading the lower pole of the spleen, with no evidence of adenopathies or free liquid.
Surgical resection was planned. A splenectomy with distal pancreatectomy, documented in the video, was performed with no complications. The histological examination confirmed a 5.8cm tumor implant, located in the splenic cord, compatible with GIST recurrence (>50 mitoses/50 fields, free margins, prognostic group 6b).
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy for a recurrent GIST
JP Pinto, T Moreno, D Poletto, A Toscano, M Lozano
1195 views
2 months ago

Frequently asked questions (FAQ)

  • I. Video content
    Which type of video can I send as a contribution to WebSurg?
    Videos of minimally invasive surgery should be scientifically relevant, and deal with one of the specialties which can be found on the website. They should put forward a surgical technique or a surgical instrument, and bring something new or interesting to the medical community. If you have a video of an operation or a technique you are proud of, share it with the rest of the world !
    Can I send a video presenting an unusual / controversial technique?
    After you have sent us your video, the peer-review committee will review it and you will receive a detailed response concerning the approval or the refusal of your video. We do have a section dedicated to “unusual / controversial cases”, which could correspond to your video. We are happy to receive contributions featuring uncommon and pioneering techniques.
    Can I send a video in which the face of the patient is visible?
    The face of the patient should be blurred in the video. The patient should not be identifiable in any other way, anything that could cause the identification of the patient on any part of the body should be blurred. If you cannot do it we can take care of this for you.
    Can I add animations and personalize my video (sound, colors, illustrations)?
    The video should not have any background music, it can include some explanations from the surgeon, and should be presented using a neutral background. Some colors and illustrations can be added as long as they don’t take the focus away from the content of the video. If you have animations which can illustrate your operation, you can insert them into the video.
  • II. Validation process
    Who validates my contribution?
    The peer-review committee is made up of qualified surgeons who are experts in their field. The committee is completely independent and is completely neutral when making decisions concerning contributions.
    Can I be sure that my video will be published?
    No, WebSurg aims to respect a certain number of criteria for the publication of videos, in order to maintain the quality of minimally invasive surgery content published on the website.
    How long does the validation process take?
    The validation process usually takes anywhere from 1 week to 1 month, depending on the availability of the committee’s members. In certain cases, it can take more than a month.
    What are the criteria upon which the validation process is based?
    Image quality
    Compliance with instructions
    Scientific and surgical relevance
    Compliance with medical principles (respect of patients, etc.)
    What happens after my video has been published?
    Once your video has been published, WebSurg mentions it in the monthly newsletter in order to communicate on our new contributions. You can also follow the evolution of your videos: comments, number of views, likes, shares, views depending on geographical location, etc.
    What can I do if my video is not accepted?
    A refusal does not mean that you cannot send more videos, making sure that WebSurg instructions are followed.
    Do WebSurg industrial partners play a role in the validation process?
    No our partners do not participate in the validation process in any way, and they are not part of the committee. The peer-review committee is made up of surgery experts in different fields, which accounts for a neutral decision-making process.
    Which video format is accepted by WebSurg?
    We accept a wide range of video formats: .mp4, .mov, .avi, 4K, etc.
    The perfect video: HD (1920x1080) .mp4 H264 VBR 10-20 Mb/s. Progressive 25-60 fps.
    Video we can accept: HD ready (1280x720). mp4 H264 VBR 5-10 Mb/s. Progressive 25-60 fps.
    Maximum quality we can manage: 4K (3840x2160). mp4 VBR 30-60 Mb/s. Progressive 25-60 fps.
    What is the maximum size for the video?
    A file of up to 20Gb can be sent using our form. However, if your video is larger in size, please contact us so that we can find a solution together.
  • III. Contributions and commercial brands
    Can I submit a video to advertize surgical instruments?
    WebSurg cannot be used as a commercial platform to advertize instruments. It can however be used to display new techniques, and new instruments – as long as the main focus of the video is the scientific relevance of the operation and/or of the use of the instrument.
    Can I send a video contribution if the logo of my surgical tools is visible?
    Yes, if the goal of the video is to display operative techniques. The video cannot simply be a commercial presentation of a product, of a company, etc.
    Can I send a video if the logo of my hospital or my company appears on the video?
    Yes, you can. However, it should not appear in the top right corner as this is where the IRCAD watermark appears in videos.
  • IV. Cost-related questions
    How much does a contribution to WebSurg cost?
    Publishing on WebSurg is completely FREE. It doesn’t cost anything and you will not receive a financial compensation for it. Find out more about the benefits of contributing to WebSurg.
    I don’t know how to edit the video, how much would the editing done by WebSurg cost?
    WebSurg can help you throughout the editing process entirely for free. Send us your operative videos, and we will help you perform the editing once our peer-review committee has validated the video.
    Can I sell the video that I have sent to WebSurg as a contribution?
    The raw footage that you send us belongs to you, which means that you can sell it or use it for other purposes. However the edited video which is published on WebSurg belongs to WebSurg. This means that it cannot be sold. You can still use this video for your communications, congresses, etc.